Art

Click here to see the “Phecomelic Child” sculpture by Jesse Berlin

Drawings and Sketches from the Creative Visions elective and Anatomical Drawing elective at Mount Sinai Medical School, which will be featured in Episodes 02 and 03 of the podcast.

Dr. Joy Reidenberg is a Professor of Medical Education, a comparative anatomist, and an artist, at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.  Her work involves studying the upper airway of mammals. She will be featured in Episode 02 and 03 of the podcast.

Student sketch of Dr. Joy Reidenberg,  a Professor of Medical Education, a comparative anatomist, and an artist, at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Her work involves studying the upper airway of mammals. She will be featured in Episode 02 and 03 of the podcast.

Sketch by Dr. Joy Reidenberg of a man with Bell's Palsy.

Sketch by Dr. Joy Reidenberg of a man with Bell’s Palsy.

Sketch of radial nerve palsy by Dr. Reidenberg.

Sketch of radial nerve palsy by Dr. Reidenberg.

Sketch of nude with musculature delineated, by Dr. Joy Reidenberg.

Sketch of nude with musculature delineated, by Dr. Joy Reidenberg.

Sketch of sitting nude model by Dr. Joy Reidenberg.

Drawing of a sitting nude model by Dr. Joy Reidenberg.

Student sketch of lying nude model with anatomy delineated.

Student sketch of lying nude model with anatomy delineated.

Student sketch of nude model.

Student drawing of nude model.

Student drawing of nude model.

Student drawing of nude model.

Student drawing of nude model.

Student sketch of nude model.

In the next set of sketches, a student was asked to draw a porpoise skull first with both eyes open, then with one eye closed.

Student drawing of porpoise skull with both eyes open.

Student sketch of porpoise skull with both eyes open.

With stereo vision, the tendency is to “look around the corner” and then to flatten this expanded image onto a flat page, distorting the proportions.

Porpoise head drawn by student with one eye closed.

Porpoise head sketched by student with one eye closed.

Paradoxically, with one eye closed, the sketch becomes more “photographic,” by restricting the information that the eye and brain take in.  These differences in perception will be further discussed in Episodes 02 and 03 of the podcast.

 

In the next set of images, Dr. Reidenberg drew objects that were held in her hand but never seen, first with eyes closed, then with eyes open but from memory of their feel.

Objects felt in the hand but not seen, then drawn without opening eyes.

Objects felt in the hand but not seen, then sketched without opening eyes.

Objects drawn from memory of their feel but with eyes open when drawing.

Objects drawn from memory of their feel but with eyes open when sketching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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